TannerOnPolicy

Home » Cato

Category Archives: Cato

Advertisements

Coming Soon (or at least eventually) The Inclusive Economy: Bringing Wealth to America’s Poor

My latest book has finally been accepted and has disappeared into the publication process – next stop copyediting. It has been more than two years in the works, and I really do see it as the most important publication of my career.

The Inclusive Economy: Bringing Wealth to America’s Poor looks at the reasons for poverty in America and offers a detailed agenda for increasing wealth, incomes, and opportunity for the neediest Americans. Notably, I challenge the conventional wisdom of both the Right and Left that underlies much of our current debate over poverty and welfare policy. I suggest that conservative critiques of a “culture of poverty” fail to account for the structural circumstances in which the poor live, especially racism, gender discrimination, and economic dislocation. However, I also criticizes liberal calls for fighting poverty through greater redistribution of wealth or new government programs.

Ultimately, I conclude that too much of contemporary anti-poverty policy focuses on making poverty less miserable, and not enough on helping people get out of poverty and becoming self-sufficient. Instead of another sterile debate over whether this program should be increased by $X billion or that program should be cut by $Y billion, I call for an end to government policies that push people into poverty. In doing so, I offer a detailed roadmap to a new anti-poverty agenda that includes criminal justice reform; greater educational freedom, including school choice; making housing more affordable through the elimination of zoning and land use regulations, banking reform, and more inclusive economic growth. These policies reject the paternalism of both Left and Right, instead empowering poor people and allowing them to take greater control of their own lives.

In attempting to marry social justice with limited government, I offer something guaranteed to displease pretty much everybody. However, I also believe that this book provides an agenda for individual empowerment that should draw support across ideological and partisan lines. We’ll see.

The Inclusive Economy has a Dec 4 catalogue date, but copies should be available well before that.

Advertisements

Can We End Poverty Conference — Livestream Now Available

Last week Cato sponsored a conference at Columbia University on “Can We End Poverty?”  The program looked at the failures of the War on Poverty and asked whether private charity can do a better job of helping the poor than can government welfare programs.

In addition to myself, participants included: John McWhorter, Center for American Studies, Columbia University; Ron Haskins, Co-Director, Center on Children and Families, Budgeting for National Priorities Project; Angela Glover Blackwell, Founder and CEO, PolicyLink; Christopher Wimer, Co-Director, Center on Poverty and Social Policy; Robert Doar, Morgridge Fellow in Poverty Studies, American Enterprise Institute; Jo Kwong, Director of Economic Opportunity Programs, Philanthropy Roundtable; Harriet Karr-McDonald, Executive Vice President, Doe Fund; Robert Woodson, Founder and President, Center for Neighborhood Enterprise; David Beito, Professor of American History, University of Alabama; and Ruth Rathblott, President and Chief Executive Office, Harlem Educational Activities Fund, among others.

You can now view the livestream of that event at 

http://www.cato.org/events/can-we-end-poverty

The Libertarian Mind

libertarian-mind-cover-4

Anyone wanting to know more about libertarianism, or why I consider myself a libertarian, need look no further than David Boaz’s new book, The Libertarian Mind: A Manifesto for Freedom.

http://www.cato.org/libertarianmind

Boaz masterfully explains the philosophical underpinnings of libertarianism, in easy, accessible language, and applies that philosophy to contemporary policy issues in very practical ways.

Simply put, a must read, not just for libertarians, but for policy junkies everywhere.

Rescheduled–My conference on the War on Poverty

Last month my conference on “Can We End Poverty,” at Columbia University was snowed out.  It has now been rescheduled for March 26.

We will be looking at the failures of the War on Poverty and nongovernmental alternatives.

Speakers will include, in addition to me, John Allison, President, Cato Institute; John McWhorter, Center for American Studies, Columbia University; Ron Haskins, Co-Director, Center on Children and Families, Budgeting for National Priorities Project; Angela Glover Blackwell, Founder and CEO, PolicyLink; Christopher Wimer, Co-Director, Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Columbia University; Jo Kwong, Director of Economic Opportunity Programs, Philanthropy Roundtable; Harriet Karr-McDonald, Executive Vice President, Doe Fund; Robert Woodson, Founder and President, Center for Neighborhood Enterprise; David Beito, Professor of American History, University of Alabama; Eloise Anderson, Wisconsin Secretary of Children and Families; and Tess Reynolds, CEO of New Door ventures in San Francisco.

I hope that you can join us.  To register, go to:

http://www.cato.org/events/can-we-end-poverty